UberShare
My team visualized a car-sharing platform for Uber that allows customers to join, find, reserve, and a return rental vehicles.
CLIENT
Exploratory project for
DESIGNATION

ROLE
UX Designer
Interaction Designer

TIMELINE
3.5 Weeks

DELIVERABLES
Domain research
Competitive analysis
User interviews
Affinity diagramming
User Personas
User journey map
Concept testing
Usability testing
Mid-fidelity wireframes
App map
InVision prototype
01
CHALLENGE
The sharing economy gives millennials access to big ticket items without the burden of ownership. Uber wants to use their fleet of modern vehicles and their existing service experience to create a digital self service system that competes in the car-sharing space.
02
APPROACH
It was clear in our research that people were genuinely turned off by the idea of renting someone else’s car but loved the idea of saving money.

How can we create a platform that feels personal, transparent, and saves money for the car-sharing user?
The notion of community rang loud and clear throughout our research and design iterations.
"Sharing someone else's car is too personal a space for me. It freaks me out a little."
- Interviewee when asked their opinion of car-sharing
03
RESULT
Existing car-sharing services don’t offer enough inexpensive sharing options, feel impersonal, and fail to leverage user’s social networks and existing communities. We've aimed to correct that in our final solution with the following functionality:
SHARING IS CARING
Our research pointed to an aversion to getting in a stranger's car.

Our solution resolves this discomfort by integrating the user's network and community to access vehicles that are only a few degrees of separation away from the user.
FULL TRANSPARENCY
Users felt the frustration of fines and unexpected bills from past rental experiences.

Our solution let's the user know exactly what they'll pay at multiple touch-points in the flow.
SPLIT THE BILL
67% of interviewees said they'd likely take the cheapest option no matter what. 83% said they often ride with friends.

UberShare gives the user the opportunity to split their fare with people in their network right from the app.
FINAL INVISION PROTOTYPE
INVISION PROTOTYPE
Laine here! 
I did the unthinkable and put the cart before the horse by telling you the ending first (ballsy, I know).

They say beauty is in the details, if you're interested in reading more about my team's in-depth design process, click the button below. 
SHOW AND HIDE DETAILS
The Details
01
EMPATHIZE
THE SHARING ECONOMY

The sharing economy gives millennials access to big ticket items without the burden of ownership. The success of companies like AirBnb, TaskRabbit, and Uber have proven the viability of this growing market shift.
UNDERSTANDING THE USER

Synthesizing our extensive ethnographic research helped us understand a typical car rental experience, people’s transportation needs, and general pain points with existing platforms.
Affinity diagram used to synthesize user data
Identifying these patterns through user interviews and research, we were able to synthesize our data to a primary persona.
We mapped out a typical car-rental trip for Rachel to start to put ourselves in Rachel’s shoes and unpack the specifics of the challenge.
User Journey Map
02
DEFINE
* Creating an UberPool model and adding a split fare option were direct outcomes of this exercise.

We developed 6 guiding design principles based on our analysis of our synthesized persona to help keep us in check as we move into brainstorming design solutions for the platform-
On-demand
Design focuses on the user’s command- when you want it
and where you want it with the click of button
Communicative
Design will assure the user with feedback of it’s safety and
reliability every step of the way
Transparent
Design gives user the option of exploring deeper car and
rider specifications with full disclosure
Collective
Despite being digital, the platform still feels like a
community
Accountable
Along with the community element, design affirms
accountability of the driver to it’s community
03
IDEATE
SHARING THE RIDE

Multiple rounds of rapid sketching and brainstorming led us towards a solutions that kept cost down (read: important to our users) and leverages Uber's existing platform (read: project constraint). We tested two solutions:

Car-sharing via pooling. Users would be able to reduce their cost by accessing additional passengers through functionality similar to UberPool.

Split-fare functionality. Users could manually add friends to their ride. This would give the user more control of who is in their car.
Dot voting exercise post brainstorming session to help narrow solutions
Both of these solutions tied in nicely with our design principles; particularly Community and Collective, two principles deeply rooted in our user research.

When testing these two solutions, users' preferences and comfort levels were pretty apparent:
04
PROTOTYPE & TESTING
PERFECTING THE FLOW

Iterations after initial concept testing included a few changes to the overall flow:
Iterating on this flow in user testing and over the course of our design process brought us to a solution that offered more ease to the user; adding this functionality to the end of the flow.
GETTING ON-BRAND

Now that we've perfected the flow and features of our application, we needed to design the UI. Our design principles were a guiding light at this stage.

We tested 4 different UI concepts with users, my design was a standout in testing; users opted for the UI that felt the most like Uber's branding.
My UI design explored a dropdown overlay screen so that Users continued to transition on top of the home screen in order to book a car. It isn't until the final booking steps that you navigate to a car selection and payment page. This choice was reflective of our design principle, on-demand
05
CONCLUSION
HINDSIGHT AND REFLECTION

While our application offers a fast and cost-effective car-sharing solution, there is still room for improvement and further testing. This project was a good lesson in prioritizing solutions and narrowing scope to what is achievable in the timeline available.
Overall, Users aren't entirely comfortable with the idea yet. We found within our iterations that we were able to put users at ease some, but a fence still exists.
While I have your attention, check out some of my other work: 
Avoiding debt
A web platform for student loan applications
Perfect pairings
A digital interface for wine and food pairing
Crafting mindfulness
A responsive website for a sustainable brand
I'd love to collaborate, talk shop, or shoot the breeze.
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